3 Things You Should Know About Infant Vaccines

By Elaine Hegwood Bowen, M.S.J., ACCESS Media Relations Specialist
April 19, 2018

Did you know vaccines protect infants from 14 life-threatening diseases? Yet, each year hundreds of children die in the U.S. from vaccine-preventable diseases. As part of National Infant Immunization Week, ACCESS is hoping to raise awareness of the importance of vaccinations. Here is what you should know about infant vaccines.  

  1. They can erase disease
    Smallpox used to be a life-threatening disease. Today, it is not considered a fatal disease, thanks to the smallpox vaccine. Basically, when vaccines are consistently used, disease rates decline, or the disease becomes eradicated. However, even rare diseases, like Polio, still require vaccines because they exist in other countries. All it takes is one person to cause a deadly outbreak

  2. They boost immune systems
    When babies are born, their immune systems are weak. Even something like the flu can be deadly for an infant. Vaccines give babies the extra boost their immune systems need, so they can fight disease.

  3. They protect your baby before it’s born
    When you’re pregnant, your baby is exposed to the same things you are. That means when you get vaccinated, you aren’t just protecting yourself — you’re helping build your baby’s immune system, too. The Centers for Disease Control recommends you get a whooping cough and flu vaccine during each pregnancy to help protect yourself and your baby.

Protect your baby
Vaccines are one of the best ways we can protect our kids. To make sure your infant gets the right vaccine at the right time, follow the CDC vaccination schedule. When vaccines are delayed or missed altogether, infants are at risk for disease.  

Find a doctor
Looking for a pediatrician or family doctor for your baby? ACCESS can help

Sources:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Vaccines.gov