COVID-19 Vaccinations at ACCESS

ACCESS is now providing COVID-19 vaccinations to all local residents at ACCESS vaccination sites and select ACCESS health centers.

 

To schedule your first dose appointment, call 1.833.754.2149. The COVID-19 vaccination is administered at no cost and second dose appointments will be scheduled onsite. Walk-ins available.

 

Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines are available for you and your family members age 12 and older.

 

ACCESS COVID-19 Vaccine Locations:

 

 

When will I be eligible for the COVID-19 Vaccine?

Currently, Illinois is Phase 2, which includes all patients 12 and older.  

 

How do I schedule my appointment? 

Call 1.833.754.2149 to schedule your first dose appointment. Your second dose appointment will be scheduled onsite.

 

What vaccine will I receive?

ACCESS is currently offering the Moderna, Pfizer and Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

 

Is there a cost to get the vaccine? 

If you are uninsured, your vaccine is covered by the federal government HRSA program. If you are insured, we will bill your insurance. You will not be charged a copay or deductible. If your insurance provider attempts to pass the bill to you, please call us at 312.526.2424 with any supporting documents. Please note, we will never charge you for your COVID-19 vaccine and will always support you to resolve any issues.

 

What if I am not an ACCESS patient, can I schedule my vaccine?

You do not need to be an ACCESS patient to make an appointment. 

 

What to Know About the COVID-19 Vaccine 

 

What are the benefits of getting the COVID-19 vaccine?  

When you get vaccinated, it can help you from getting seriously sick. It may also help protect the people around you. People who have had COVID-19 still benefit from getting vaccinated. Stopping a pandemic requires using all the tools we have available. COVID-19 vaccination combined with daily preventative actions will offer the best protection from COVID-19.

 

What is the COVID-19 vaccine and how does it work? 

The first vaccines available are called “mRNA” vaccines. The mRNA vaccine, or “messenger RNA vaccine”, does not contain a live virus. Rather, the vaccine causes the cells to produce a protein similar to those in COVID-19 so your immune system is introduced to the protein and can build up its immune response. The COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19 or test positive on a viral test because it does not contain the live virus.

 

After getting a flu shot, I always get the flu. Will this cause me to get COVID-19?  

No, you cannot become infected, or infect others, from receiving the COVID-19 vaccine, because the vaccine contains no live virus. Instead, the vaccine directs your body to produce a protein that teaches your body how to fight off the virus. After getting a flu shot, some people develop flu-like symptoms, such as mild fever, chills and body aches. These symptoms are not the same as actually having influenza. The same is true for COVID-19 vaccines.

 

Are there side effects?  

After a vaccination, it is normal to feel some mild side effects. Side effects signal that your body is building up protection from the virus. Reported common side effects include: pain or soreness at the injection site, fatigue and headache. You may also experience mild fever, chills, nausea or body aches. The side effects from vaccination may feel a little bit like the flu, but they should go away after 48 to 72 hours.  

 

Can the COVID-19 vaccine cause me to become infected or infect others?  

No, you cannot become infected or infect others from receiving the COVID-19 vaccine, because the vaccine contains no live virus. Instead, the vaccine directs your body to produce a protein that shows your body how to fight off the virus.

 

What are the vaccine recommendations for children under the age of 12?  

At this time, there is not a pediatric vaccine for children under the age of 12. The Pfizer vaccine is approved for individuals over the age of 12. The Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccine are approved only for individuals over the age of 18. Until studies are completed, a vaccine for children under 12 is not expected to be available in the immediate future.

 

If someone has a COVID diagnosis within the last 90 days, should they wait to get the vaccine? 

According to the CDC, individuals may choose to wait to get the vaccine if they have had a COVID diagnosis in the last 90 days. Affected individuals should talk with their ACCESS provider for further guidance on their specific situation.

 

I've had COVID-19, should I get the vaccine? 

Yes. The Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (CDC) recommends you should be vaccinated regardless of whether you have already had COVID-19. Patients who have recently had COVID-19 should talk to with their primary care provider about the best time to receive the vaccine.

 

How many doses of the COVID-19 vaccine do I need? 

In order to receive maximum protection from COVID-19, the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines require two doses, while the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine requires only one dose. The timing between your first and second dose depends on which vaccine you received. 

The Pfizer vaccine requires a second dose three weeks or 21 days from your first shot. The Moderna vaccine requires a second dose one month or 28 days after your first shot. 

ACCESS cannot guarantee what type of vaccine will be available but all vaccines are approved for Emergency Use and Authorization (EUA) by the FDA and effective against COVID-19. 

 

I have a pre-existing condition. Is the COVID-19 vaccine safe? 

Adults of any age with certain underlying medical conditions are at increased risk for severe illness from the virus that causes COVID-19. COVID-19 vaccines may be administered to people with underlying medical conditions provided they have not had a severe or immediate allergic reaction to any of the ingredients in the vaccine. Clinical trials have not yet been completed on those with certain pre-existing conditions, so safety data is limited. Speak to your ACCESS provider to help you make an informed decision.

 

I am pregnant or breastfeeding. Is the COVID-19 vaccine safe? 

If you are pregnant or breastfeeding and part of a group offered the COVID-19 vaccine early on due to high risk of exposure to COVID-19, you may choose to be vaccinated. Studies show that pregnancy can place a person at risk for more severe illness due to the  COVID-19 virus. Studies are ongoing on the vaccine and pregnant women. Choosing to get the vaccine is a personal choice and your ACCESS provider can help you make an informed decision. 

 

 

Additional Resources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH)  

Cook County Health 

DuPage County Health Department  

 

Visit Zocdoc.com/vaccine and the Vaccine Finder to see vaccine providers in your area.

 

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award totaling $31,443,750.00 with 0% financed with non-governmental sources. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government. For more information, please visit HRSA.gov.